Jay Nixon is an incompetent governor. The right answer is Justice not Cynical Forces.

Is the Governor racist ? Apparently yes. Is he cynical ? Yes, putting the black puppet, Captain Johnson at the fake position of the Leader of Police forces coupled with his status of spokeperson of the state and Ferguson forces. A parrot.

Excerpt (see below)

For a community that is 2/3 African American, there are only three black officers on the 53 person police force. According to the Missouri Attorney General annual report on policing, although blacks make up 63% of the population of Ferguson, they make up 86% of police stops. Blacks are almost two times as likely to be searched and are arrested twice as often as whites although whites are more likely to possess contraband (Kevin Zeese). 

Captain Johnson can be black. It represents the Racist board of direction at Ferguson using a black man to lie to the people over their truly nature and intentions. Calling the military federal unit at the time the second autopsy on Brown is showing the young man was shot 6 times – 3 bullets at the head is insane and ultimately provocative and contemptuous.

How many autopsies the Attorney General is going to conduct before the Officer is brought to Justice ? This third autopsy looks like a joke. Are the coroners also incompetent ? Crazy.

Until Justice is done, demonstrations will not end. Justice is not a favor, it is a Constitutional Citizen Right, Black or White and a Duty for a well governing State. By the way A curfew can be attacked in Court in regard to the respect of individual rights related to freedom of circulation and meeting in public places.

>>> That is why we wrote yesterday that : DECLARING A STATE OF EMERGENCY TO IMPLEMENT A CURFEW IS A WRONG DECISION. 

Lootings  are part of the whole showdown.

Some have said Michael brown was a theft and he had threatened a little police man who happened to be white with his 1,93 height and 135 weight. Michael Brown was apparently marching towards the little police man, who, caught by fear to be eaten by the Black ogre, found itself in a position of legitime defence in front of an unarmed teenager of 18. The wrong instructed Zimmerman’s case is back. Another case of incompentence by some grand Jury. What about Trayvon ?

If you call this a police man, being afraid of an unarmed boy, then this man was not at the right place.

I invite you to take a look at this article by Eurasia news:

1OPINIONSOCIAL ISSUESUNITED STATES

FERGUSON EXPOSES REALITY OF MILITARIZED, RACIST POLICING – OPED

By  and 

The killing of Michael Brown by a Ferguson, MO police officer, who was identified Friday as Darren Wilson, and the aftermath in which nonviolent protesters and reporters were met with a violent and militarized police force have exposed something that has been building for years. Many have written about the militarization of the police and the disproportionate impact they have on people of color, but now more Americans are seeing this reality and cannot escape it.

Capture-nO-mORE-nAMESMichael Brown is one of four unarmed black men killed in the last month by police. On July 17, Eric Garner was killed by an illegal chokehold in New York. On August 5, John Crawford was shot in a store in Beavercreek, OH. Just after Brown’s death, on August 9Ezell Ford, a young man with known mental illness, was shot in Los Angeles. These are four examples of many, according to a recent study, a black man is killed every 28 hours by police, security guards or vigilantes. The whole nation is experiencing these tragedies; reality is being forced upon us.

The public reaction to the event has been immense. On Thursday evening protests were held from coast-to-coast expressing solidarity with the people of Ferguson and grief for the death of Michael Brown and the deaths of others across the nation killed by police. There are now increasing calls for the demilitarization of the police by the Attorney General and elected officials. And, the DOJ has announced a broad review of police practices that lead to deadly force. People are taking action pressuring the DOJ to act, see: Tell The Department of Justice to end racist and militaristic policing.

This is a teachable moment and an opportunity to advance the cause of transforming the police. Hundreds of thousands of Americans watched events unfold in Ferguson. They saw the police tear gassing a community in mourning, firing at them with rubber bullets and using sound canons to disperse them. They saw military-style police chase them into neighborhoods where they continued to fire tear gas and rubber bullets. They saw reporters abused and arrested as a SWAT team took over a McDonald’s where they were reporting from and other reporters attacked with tear gas and then the police dismantling the journalist’s equipment.

These events led to news outlets reporting on the actions of the police with even greater intensity. In response to the arrest of one of their reporters, Ryan Grim wrote an official Huffington Post statement about the journalist’s arrest which made a key point: “Police militarization has been among the most consequential and unnoticed developments of our time.” The police in Ferguson did an excellent job of drawing the nation’s attention to the reality of 21st Century policing and the need to dramatically change its direction.

The rhetoric of a “war” on drugs and “war” on crime is no longer mere rhetoric.

Over the last few decades police forces in the United States, down to small town forces, have been militarized by the federal government.  Militarization has been part of the escalating clampdown on dissent; and the targets of these extreme policing practices are disproportionately communities of color.  Practices like ‘stop and frisk’ and ‘driving while black,’ as well as policies focused on Arabs and Muslims, have shown that racially-based policing is the intentional policy of police across the country.

Much of this has been growing in police departments in secret without transparency or public debate.

Would the public want a militarized police force if they had a voice in the decision? Without a democratic process, the US has essentially created a standing army that violates the fundamentals of the US Constitution. The military police force applies the law unequally, violating equal protection of the laws and undermining the justice system as police take on the role of judge and executioner.

How Did We Get Here?

Racist policing is not new. 

As Victor E. Kappeler points out, “the St. Louis police were founded to protect residents from Native Americans in that frontier city” and “in 1704, the colony of Carolina developed the nation’s first slave patrol.” These patrols developed into the first police departments.  The purpose of the first police was to control the slave population and protect the property interests of slave holders. This disastrous racial legacy continues to this day.

Ferguson is not unusual when it comes to racially unfair policing, tensions between police and the African American community has been building for years. For a community that is 2/3 African American, there are only three black officers on the 53 person police force. According to the Missouri Attorney General annual report on policing, although blacks make up 63% of the population of Ferguson, they make up 86% of police stops. Blacks are almost two times as likely to be searched and are arrested twice as often as whites although whites are more likely to possess contraband. While these are ugly statistics, the state of Missouri is even worse.The NAACP sued St. Louis for the racial disparity in its traffic stops. One resident told the Washington Post: “Everybody in this city has been a victim of DWB [driving while black].”

The militarization of police is a more recent phenomenon.  

Peter Kraska of the University of Eastern Kentucky has been writing about this since the early 1990s. He documents the rapid rise of Police Paramilitary Units (PPU’s, informally SWAT teams) which are modeled after special operations teams in the military.  PPU’s did not exist anywhere until 1971when Los Angeles under the leadership of the infamous police chief Daryl Gates, formed the first one and used it for demolishing homes with tanks equipped with battering rams.  By 2000, there were 30,000 police SWAT teams; Kraska reports that by the late 1990s, 89% of police departments in cities of over 50,000 had PPUs, almost double the mid-80s figure; and in smaller towns of between 25,000 and 50,000 by 2007, 80% had a PPU quadrupling from 20% in the mid-80s.

And Kraska reported that SWAT teams were active with 45,000 deployments in 2007 compared to 3,000 in the early 80s.  The most common use he found was for serving drug search warrants where they were used 80% of the time, but they were also increasingly used for patrolling neighborhoods. These numbers are consistent with a recent report by the ACLU.

Another important chronicler of the rise of militarism in policing is Radley Balko, author ofRise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces.  He reported a “1,500% increase in the use of SW AT teams over the last two decades” and wrote in the ABA Journalin 2013that “SWAT teams violently smash into private homes more than 100 times per day.” Their use of flash-bang grenades has caused injuries to children and aseven year old was shot and killed in her sleep when a SWAT team forced entry into the wrong house. There are many examples of similar abuses.

Colin Jenkins points out in Coming Home to Roost: American Militarism, War Culture, and Police Brutality, that this was a gradual process. There was never a debate about militarizing the police but instead a series of decisions around the late 60s protest movement, the drug war and post 9/11 policing. The trend became particularly noticeable in the 1980s when the Reagan-era drug war created exceptions to the Posse Comitatus Act, a Reconstruction Era law that kept the military out of domestic enforcement. This is when SWAT teams began to be used to serve drug search warrants. The post-9/11 era gave police even greater power under the Patriot Act and seemingly unlimited resources to fight terrorism. Of course militarized police have rarely been used to fight domestic terrorism because there really is not much terrorism in the US to fight.

Jenkins points out billions of dollars of military equipment have flowed to police departments across the country: “They possess everything from body armor to high-powered weaponry to tanks, armored vehicles, and even drones.” He asks why, pointing out that it is not because of safety, noting there are 50 fatalities annually out of 900,000 officers nationwide. That is 1 out of 18,000 police maliciously killed each year (the odds of being killed by lightning in your lifetime are 1 out of 3,000).  He blames the US war culture and believes police have become militaristic because they have shifted from defense to offense where they aggressively confront and repress the people, rather than protect and serve the community.

The problem may also be compounded by programs such as the Chamber of Commerce’s ‘Hiring our Heroes,’ that intentionally seek out active military and veterans to work in police departments. The DoJ has a program called ‘COPS’ that fast tracks members of the military into police work. The San Antonio Police Departments boasts that military personnel transition smoothly into police work. Perhaps it is because they are using the same equipment and techniques. This raises concerns about what effect police work in a militarized environment has on veterans who experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Then there is the problem of police steroid use which has psychological impact, i.e. “roid rage.”

It is important to emphasize that we got to this point without public debate.

…..

A lot of the para-military law enforcement activities are conducted with multi-agency task forces that also lack transparency.

The police are ruling themselves, rather than being ruled by the people in any democratic way.

Another area where militarized police are used is in cracking down on political dissent. 

During the occupy encampments there was aggressive use of militarized police across the country as part of the forced closing of the encampments. Again, this occurs in part through federalization of local policing operating as part of Joint Terrorism Task Forceswith federal agencies like the FBI or Homeland Security.  It not only affected Occupy but the military was on call for both the Democratic and Republican Conventions in 2012again operating with local police under the auspices of the Joint Terrorism Task Forces as part of the military’s Northern Command.

What is needed to end militarized policing?  

FOR THE WHOLE STORY – GO TO EURASIANEWS…

FACT OF THE DAY

Julian Assange is announcing he is going to leave the Ecuador Embassy SOON. Ah han. He needs treatment and freedom.

Gaza/Israel, the stalemate is looming. Israel needs State’s Men to lead this overmilitarised nation, enrolling teens, by force, in its paramilitary society. So far Palestinians have had to deal with the Israeli cabinet’s post-nazism fanaticized ideologues.

The lifting of Gaza Blockade is non negociable. Gazans are not beasts but Human Beings.

Israel security is not a precondition to peace but a consequence of that.

On this point read our previous posts :

Netanyahu, the Terminator angel.

Gaza.

Blocus of Gaza = Boycott of Israel.

ISRAEL HAS COMMITTED A GENOCIDE IN GAZA. THE TIME FOR ANOTHER NURENBERG IS AHEAD.